• Document: Valery Bronznik. The Chigorin Defence. Schachverlag Kania
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Valery Bronznik The Chigorin Defence Schachverlag Kania Contents 3 Contents Contents ...........................................................................................................3 Symbols ...........................................................................................................4 Introduction ...........................................................................................................5 Acknowledgements ...............................................................................................8 Chapter 1 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. c3 dxc4 4.e3 ..............................................9 Chapter 2 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. c3 dxc4 4.d5 ............................................ 20 Chapter 3 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. c3 dxc4 4. f3 ......................................... 50 Chapter 4 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. c3 f6 .................................................... 104 Chapter 5 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 g4 4.cxd5 xf3 5.gxf3 ................... 119 Chapter 6 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 g4 4.cxd5 xf3 5.dxc6 xc6 6. c3 . 142 Chapter 7 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 g4 4. c3 ......................................... 157 Chapter 8 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 g4 4.e3 ............................................ 169 Chapter 9 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 g4 4. a4 ......................................... 174 Chapter 10 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3. f3 e5......................................................... 181 Chapter 11 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.cxd5 xd5 4. f3 e5 ................................. 195 Chapter 12 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.cxd5 xd5 4.e3 e5 5. c3 b4 6. d2 xc3 7.bxc3 ..................................................................... 206 Chapter 13 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.cxd5 xd5 4.e3 e5 5. c3 b4 6. d2 xc3 7. xc3 ................................................................... 260 Chapter 14 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.e3 e5 4.dxe5 .............................................. 297 Chapter 15 1.d4 d5 2. f3 c6 3. f4 (3. g5, 3.e3) 3... g4 .................... 303 Chapter 16 1.d4 d5 2. f3 c6 3.g3 .............................................................. 317 Index of Players ................................................................................................. 330 Bibliography ....................................................................................................... 332 Index of Variations ............................................................................................. 333 Introduction 5 Introduction Dear chess friend! • Against a weaker opponent we nor- mally want to win. But if our opponent As every chess player, of course you has got the initiative from the very have worried about which kind of beginning, it often happens that our at- openings to apply in order to be as tempts to neutralize only lead to equali- successful as possible. With Black it is ty. particularly difficult to make the right choice - right from the start we are in a • Nor is it recommendable to get into situation in which the opponent tries to a passive position against a stronger force his will upon us. opponent. He will certainly be pleased with this and try to initiate some plan of What can we do to get rid of this pres- attack. Because of the different playing sure? strengths, it can often happen that we There are different ways of dealing with recognise his ideas too late. And in a this problem. passive position a single inaccuracy can cost us the whole point. Many players strive for a maybe some- what passive, but solid position with • The probability of the opponent Black, intending to equalize the chan- getting into time trouble when we play ces sooner or later by accurate play in such a way is relatively small. But and precise defence. And if the oppo- we ourselves are in much greater nent over-extends his position, in this danger of suffering time trouble, be- way they even may achieve a whole cause defending a passive position point. normally needs more time than the attack. This restricted method is, by all means, possible, but there are a lot of draw- • If our opponent has an active po- backs, e.g.: sition he will feel good psychologically as well. • There are relatively few possibilities for the opponent to blunder in the For that reasons many players dispense opening or in the early middlegame with qu

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